TAG LOUISIANA

Louisiana Cooperative
Marine Fish Tagging Program

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Fish Tagged
198281
Fish Recaptured
7395



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    (Nov 17, 2014)  - The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and the Coastal Conservation Association of Louisiana honored volunteer fish taggers during their annual Louisiana Cooperative Marine Fish Tagging Program’s awards banquet on Thursday, November 6 at the Petroleum Club in Lafayette, La.
     
    The program relies on a group of volunteers who dedicated nearly 3,200 hours to fish tagging efforts this year.  The event honored those volunteers who tagged 20 or more fish during the season, which ran from July 2013 to September 2014.
     
    Nearly 26,000 fish were tagged, more than doubling the amount of fish tagged in the previous season. The increased number of tagged fish can be attributed to more than 700 volunteers who tagged at least one fish during that timeframe. 
     
    “The tagging program is only possible because of the anglers who volunteer their time to fish, tag, collect, and report data,” said LDWF Assistant Secretary Randy Pausina. “We’re very lucky to have such an extraordinary group of volunteers who contribute to this important source of recreational fisheries data.”
     
    Program officials recognized 57 volunteer anglers who out-competed their colleagues as members of the Century Club by tagging more than 100 fish during the season. 
     
    Women and youth participation in the program is also growing in popularity. In recognition of their efforts, 24 women and youth anglers were awarded prizes during the event.
     
    Top Fish Taggers include:
     
    Tagger of the Year - Dr. Victor Tedesco, III
    Most Tagged Fish Overall (1,574)
    Most Tagged Fish Recaptured (77)
    Most Volunteer Hours (446.5)
     
    Most Tagged Redfish
    1st Place - Donna Dearman (663)
    2nd Place - Jeff Bavar (657)
    3rd Place - Andre Thomas (526)
     
    Most Tagged Speckled Trout
    1st Place- Dr. Victor Tedesco, III (1,308)
    2nd Place - Larry Shields (521)
    3rd Place - Diane and Norman Norton (359)
     
    Most Tagged Red Snapper
    1st Place - Andre Thomas (43)
    2nd Place - Mike Patrick (27)
    3rd Place - Tommy Moore (23)
     
    Fish tagging can provide a wealth of information, including data on migration patterns, growth rates, and population size. Since the program began in the 1980s, nearly 183,000 fish have been tagged and of those over 5,700 have been recaptured.
     
    “One exciting thing we’ve learned through taggers’ data is most fish are recaptured very close to their original tagging location, explained Pausina.  “One redfish in particular was tagged, released, and then recaptured a record 4 times – all near the LDWF Fisheries Research Lab in Grand Isle, La.  In fact, only about 2 percent of tagged red drum and spotted seatrout are recaptured more than 50 miles from the location where they were originally tagged and released.”
     
    The Louisiana Cooperative Marine Fish Tagging Program is a cooperative effort between the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Coastal Conservation Association of Louisiana, universities, non-profit organizations and volunteer anglers.  Program goals include educating anglers on fisheries management and conservation and opening communication between researchers and anglers.
     
    LDWF urges interested saltwater anglers to join the program.  Tagging kits and program materials are provided at no charge.  For more information about the Louisiana Cooperative Marine Fish Tagging Program, contact us by calling 1-800-567-2182, via Facebook atwww.facebook.com/tag/louisiana or email Fishtags@wlf.la.gov.
     
    The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources.  For more information, visit us at www.wlf.la.gov, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffb or follow us on Twitter @LDWF.
     
    For press inquiries, contact Ashley Wethey at awethey@wlf.la.gov or (225) 721-0489.
     
    The program relies on a group of volunteers who dedicated nearly 3,200 hours to fish tagging efforts this year.  The event honored those volunteers who tagged 20 or more fish during the season, which ran from July 2013 to September 2014.
     
    Nearly 26,000 fish were tagged, more than doubling the amount of fish tagged in the previous season. The increased number of tagged fish can be attributed to more than 700 volunteers who tagged at least one fish during that timeframe. 
     
    “The tagging program is only possible because of the anglers who volunteer their time to fish, tag, collect, and report data,” said LDWF Assistant Secretary Randy Pausina. “We’re very lucky to have such an extraordinary group of volunteers who contribute to this important source of recreational fisheries data.”
     
    Program officials recognized 57 volunteer anglers who out-competed their colleagues as members of the Century Club by tagging more than 100 fish during the season. 
     
    Women and youth participation in the program is also growing in popularity. In recognition of their efforts, 24 women and youth anglers were awarded prizes during the event.
     
    Top Fish Taggers include:
     
    Tagger of the Year - Dr. Victor Tedesco, III
    Most Tagged Fish Overall (1,574)
    Most Tagged Fish Recaptured (77)
    Most Volunteer Hours (446.5)
     
    Most Tagged Redfish
    1st Place - Donna Dearman (663)
    2nd Place - Jeff Bavar (657)
    3rd Place - Andre Thomas (526)
     
    Most Tagged Speckled Trout
    1st Place- Dr. Victor Tedesco, III (1,308)
    2nd Place - Larry Shields (521)
    3rd Place - Diane and Norman Norton (359)
     
    Most Tagged Red Snapper
    1st Place - Andre Thomas (43)
    2nd Place - Mike Patrick (27)
    3rd Place - Tommy Moore (23)
     
    Fish tagging can provide a wealth of information, including data on migration patterns, growth rates, and population size. Since the program began in the 1980s, nearly 183,000 fish have been tagged and of those over 5,700 have been recaptured.
     
    “One exciting thing we’ve learned through taggers’ data is most fish are recaptured very close to their original tagging location, explained Pausina.  “One redfish in particular was tagged, released, and then recaptured a record 4 times – all near the LDWF Fisheries Research Lab in Grand Isle, La.  In fact, only about 2 percent of tagged red drum and spotted seatrout are recaptured more than 50 miles from the location where they were originally tagged and released.”
     
    The Louisiana Cooperative Marine Fish Tagging Program is a cooperative effort between the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Coastal Conservation Association of Louisiana, universities, non-profit organizations and volunteer anglers.  Program goals include educating anglers on fisheries management and conservation and opening communication between researchers and anglers.
     
    LDWF urges interested saltwater anglers to join the program.  Tagging kits and program materials are provided at no charge.  For more information about the Louisiana Cooperative Marine Fish Tagging Program, contact us by calling 1-800-567-2182, via Facebook atwww.facebook.com/tag/louisiana or email Fishtags@wlf.la.gov.
     
    The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources.  For more information, visit us at www.wlf.la.gov, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffb or follow us on Twitter @LDWF.
     
    For press inquiries, contact Ashley Wethey at awethey@wlf.la.gov or (225) 721-0489.


    (Oct. 16, 2014) - Coastal Conservation Association of Louisiana, Apache Corporation, Fieldwood Energy and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries will begin construction this week on an artificial reef system at the site of the recently removed structures in Ship Shoal 26, known by many Louisiana anglers as “the Pickets.” A dedication ceremony and media site visit will be conducted at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, at Coco Marina in Cocodrie, La.   
     
    This cooperative effort calls for the deployment of roughly 14,000 tons of 4-inch limestone over three specially engineered artificial reefs.  The reefs will be designed to protect depressions in the seafloor that were created by the prevailing current flowing around and through the Pickets. In doing so, the reefs will maintain and enhance these scour holes, while providing additional habitat for marine life.
     
    “This area has served as a trout fishing haven for many years, and we are extremely pleased that we are able to preserve this angling hot spot,” said LDWF Assistant Secretary Randy Pausina.  "Speckled trout and redfish are typically associated with low- to mid-relief structures which provide a refuge from currents, where they can remain without expending energy while preying on food as it is carried across the structure. This makes this area a particularly important fisheries habitat.”
     
    “There are many trout fishermen in this state who have fond memories of the Pickets," said David Cresson, executive director of Coastal Conservation Association of Louisiana (CCA Louisiana.) “It’s unfortunate that we have to say goodbye to those structures, but we are grateful to have partners here who were committed to doing everything they could to maintain the area for future generations. The Pickets has been a special place, and this partnership is working to make sure it stays that way.”
     
    Fieldwood acquired Apache's Gulf of Mexico shelf assets in 2013, including the Pickets structures and pilings located at Ship Shoal 26. As part of the acquisition, Fieldwood entered into a decommissioning agreement with Apache and is responsible for making sure the removal work at Ship Shoal 26, which is required by the federal government, is completed. From the outset, both companies understood the significance of the iconic structures and were committed to mitigating the impact of the removals on the fishery and the recreational angling community.
     
    Obie O'Brien, vice president of Governmental Affairs for Apache Corporation, said, "Apache has operated in South Louisiana and in the Gulf of Mexico for decades. Hundreds of our employees and former employees live, work and raise their families along the coast. We were happy to be part of this effort to preserve, protect and enhance one of the iconic fishing spots in Louisiana. We understand the need for a strong and diverse environment because we live it every day."
     
    John Seeger, Fieldwood's vice president of Decommissioning, noted, "The Pickets is an area that residents of Louisiana and Texas—including many of our employees at Fieldwood—have fished for decades. We are required by federal law to remove the structures but wanted to come up with a solution that would preserve this renowned fishing area for generations to come."
     
    The $1.2 million project is being funded by Apache, Fieldwood, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Artificial Reef Trust Fund, and CCA’s Building Conservation Trust. The contractor for construction of the reefs, DLS Energy, and the company providing the materials for the reefs, G & H Barge, are providing significant in-kind services and materials for the project. Continuing support of CCA Louisiana’s Habitat Program is provided by the Paul Candies family.
     
    The Pickets Reef is the 10th reef of its kind to be funded through the Louisiana Artificial Reef Trust fund in cooperation with CCA Louisiana.  Overall, this is the 14th reef built by CCA Louisiana since 2004.
     
    “This project is a great example of industry, nonprofits and government coming together to create a positive outcome for our coast,” said LDWF Secretary Robert Barham.  “Our thanks goes out to Apache, Fieldwood, CCA and all of our partners for working with us to find a solution to this challenging issue.”
     
    “This had the potential to be a sad ending to a storied fishing spot, but now we have a tremendous amount of hard structure going in to replace habitat that is required to be removed,” said John Walther, chairman of CCA Louisiana's Habitat Committee. “This is the best outcome that could be achieved, and Apache and Fieldwood should be commended. They didn't have to go the extra mile, but both companies wanted to make this right from the beginning and they certainly stepped up. We hope this can be a template for addressing marine habitat that stands to be lost due to the Idle Iron Policy.”
     
    Marker buoys will be placed on the site after construction is completed so that anglers can locate the reefs.
     
    After a short presentation at the Coco Marina at 10 a.m., Tuesday, members of the media will be taken by boat to the reef construction site.  Project organizers and partners will be available to the media throughout the event.
     
    For press inquiries, contact Ashley Wethey, awethey@wlf.la.gov or (225) 721-0489.


    Release Date: 10/06/2014

    Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Enforcement Division agents are seeking leads in the illegal killing of a black bear in Concordia Parish.

    A reward of up to $7,000 is being offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible.  The Humane Society of the United States and The Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust are offering $5,000, LDWF’s Operation Game Thief program up to $1,000, and the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Foundation another $1,000.

    A fisherman found the bear, badly decomposed, on Sept. 1 in the Atchafalaya River. The bear was a part of LDWF’s Black Bear Restoration Program and was radio collared over the past year to track the animal’s movements. The bear was normally tracked in the Turnbull Island area of Concordia Parish.

    At this time, agents believe that the approximately four-year-old female bear was killed in Concordia Parish and thrown in the river, where her body then floated downstream.

    The Louisiana black bear has been listed on the Federal Threatened and Endangered Species List since 1992. Residents are reminded that killing a Louisiana black bear is a violation of both state law and the federal Endangered Species Act. Violators are subject to penalties of up to $50,000 and six months in jail. In addition, a restitution fine of $10,000 for the animal may be imposed on anyone convicted of killing a black bear in Louisiana.

    Anyone with information regarding this illegal bear killing should call the Louisiana Operation Game Thief hotline at 1-800-442-2511 or use LDWF's tip411 program. To use the tip411 program, citizens can text LADWF and their tip to 847411 or download the "LADWF Tips" iPhone and Android app from the Apple App Store or Google Play free of charge.

    The hotline and the tip411 program are monitored 24 hours a day. Tipsters can also remain anonymous.

    For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.


    Release Date: 09/29/2014

    Sept. 29, 2014 -- The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries’ (LDWF) iPhone app will be renovated in coming months to make the information resource more user friendly.

    If you currently have this app on your iPhone, please install the current update.  This will remove any outdated content while the department develops a new, more user-friendly version that will provide accurate, season-specific information and regulations.

    Until that update is made, iPhone users are advised to use the LDWF web site at http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov for the most current LDWF news and information including hunting season dates and hunting and fishing regulations.

    LDWF will continue to distribute news and information through annual publications including the agency’s hunting and fishing regulations booklets, special seasonal announcements, press releases, on-line video information pieces, Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffb, or Twitter @LDWF. The department web site will continue to serve as the agency’s primary information source.

    For more information, contact Bo Boehringer at 225-765-5115 or bboehringer@wlf.la.gov .


    (Aug. 6, 2014) – The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries recently hosted two Women’s Fish Tagging Workshops at the Grand Isle Fisheries Research Lab where 25 women perfected their angling skills under the supervision and with the assistance of experienced LDWF staff.
     
    The program consists of a one-day workshop where angling and fish tagging techniques are taught to women, 18 and older, who may lack either the opportunity or confidence to learn these skills.  Every participant leaves the workshop as a more knowledgeable, independent angler. 
     
    Participants were chosen by a lottery drawing  and were required to have previously attended a one-day introductory workshop at the Gonzales Cabela’s in the spring. 
     
    The ladies began their weekend learning to rig and bait their own rod and reel, compliments of CCA Louisiana.  LDWF biologists led inshore fishing trips, providing a hands-on opportunity for the participants to utilize the skills previously learned.   Additional activities included fish cleaning, cooking fish, fish ageing and a tour of research facilities at the lab.
     
    The Louisiana Cooperative Marine Fish Tagging Program, implemented by LDWF in conjunction with CCA Louisiana, aims to improve understanding of marine fish movements, habitat preferences and population size.  The program provides interested volunteer anglers with free, saltwater fish tagging kits and focuses on several popular game fish species including redfish, speckled trout, red snapper and yellowfin tuna.  Reports of recaptures are sent to the volunteer tagger, providing details on the distance traveled and growth of the fish.
     
    Several of these dedicated “citizen scientists” tag well over 100 fish in the course of a year.
     
    The next workshop is scheduled for Spring 2015.  For more information on this program or the Louisiana Cooperative Marine Fish Tagging Program, visit www.TagLouisiana.com , www.facebook.com/Tag.Louisiana or contact Heather David at (225) 763-5415 or hdavid@wlf.la.gov.
     
    The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources.  For more information, visit us at www.wlf.louisiana.gov, on Facebook at www.facebook.com, on Instagram @WLFLA, or on Twitter @LDWF.
     
    For press inquiries, contact Ashley Wethey at awethey@wlf.la.gov or (504) 286-8733.


    Louisiana Department of Wildlife & Fisheries Coastal Conservation Association Louisiana Cooperative Marine Fish Tagging Program
    2000 Quail Drive - Office #336  Baton Rouge, LA 70808
    (225) 763-5415                        FishTags@wlf.la.gov